A tour of mystical & magical power places in West Cornwall

Lanyon Quoit
 Dating from the Neolithic period (3500-2500BC) it is believed to be the burial chamber of a long mound, Lanyon Quoit is unusual in many ways and may have been more of a mausoleum or cenotaph than a grave. This dolmen collapsed during a storm in 1815 and was re-erected nine years later. The reconstruction was not accurate because one of the uprights broke during the collapse and only three were reused. As a result, the quoit is now not so high as it was in the past. In fact, until the 18th century it was possible to sit on horseback beneath it. 





Men an tol
This iconic and highly photogenic site is one of the best known megalithic structures in Britain. The name Men-an-Tol means simply 'holed stone' and despite having been considered a significant and popular monument from a very early date, its true purpose remains a mystery.
 The Men-an-Tol has generated a wealth of folklore and tradition. It is renowned for curing many ailments, particularly rickets in children, by passing the sufferer through the hole. It was also said to provide an alternative cure “scrofulous taint”, also known as the “Kings Evil” which was otherwise only curable by the touch of the reigning monarch. The site’s reputation for curing back problems earned it the name of “Crick Stone”. The stones were also seen as a charm against witchcraft or ill-wishing, and could also be used as a tool for augury or telling the future; two brass pins laid crosswise on top of each other on the top of the stone would move independently of external intervention in accordance with the question asked. Age old myths of spirits associated with sacred places are echoes from prehistory.








Sancreed holy well
An atmospheric enchanted site, home to a cloughtie tree hung with offerings and a steep flight of steps down into the earth to a small well.
The radiation levels in the well are supposed to be 200% higher than surrounding areas, & it is suggested this may be a reason for it's sense of peace & an ability to feel trance like.

It did have a curious atmosphere indeed...not what I would personally call peaceful, and my dog seemed strangely hesitant to be there.








Carn Euny
Among the best preserved ancient villages in the south west, occupied from the Iron Age until late Roman times. It includes the foundations of stone houses, and an intriguing 'fogou' underground passage.













Comments

  1. Wow great pictures and information!!

    -martha

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  2. Wonderful places! I get strong feelings at places like this, mostly positive, occasionally negative. Animals are more tuned in than we are and it doesn't surprise me that something was sensed. Thanks for sharing! :)
    Jess xx

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